Composition of gut microbiome influenced by type 1 diabetes, research reveals

Composition of gut microbiome influenced by type 1 diabetes, research reveals

The gut microbiome is different in people with type 1 diabetes and is associated with poor glycaemic control and other health complications, new evidence has identified.

A team of researchers examined the microbiome data of 238 participants, all of whom had type 1 diabetes.

During the study they collected clinical characteristics and fecal samples, as well as performing metagenomic shotgun sequencing.

They found an association between microbial taxonomy and type 1 diabetes–related characteristics and vascular complications.

The results state: “No significant difference in the α-diversity of the gut microbiome was found between participants with type 1 diabetes and healthy control subjects. However, 43 bacterial taxa were significantly depleted in type 1 diabetes, while 37 bacterial taxa were significantly enriched.

“HbA1c and disease duration explained a significant part of the variation in the gut microbiome (R2 > 0.008, false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05), and HbA1c was significantly associated with the abundance of several microbial species. Additionally, both micro- and macrovascular complications explained a significant part of the variation in the gut microbiome (R2 > 0.0075, FDR < 0.05).”

It added: “Nephropathy was strongly associated with several microbial species. Macrovascular complications displayed similar associations with nephropathy.”

To read the full report, click here.

Author: Eileen Gilbert